Wednesday, 12 October 2011

Sony to send password reset email

Sony have detected someone trying to gain access to their various networks again, by using ID and password pairs that Sony conclude have been extracted from someone else's network. This may be a valid conclusion as it was only a small percentage of users that were affected (less than 0.1%, which is still 93,000). Sony have been upfront and quick to react, disabling the affected accounts and putting out a notice.

However, their next step, according to the notice given by their Chief Information Security Officer (CISO), is to send all the users who have been affected an email asking them to change their password.

Cue phishing scam!

Surely some bright spark will now construct a phishing email to send out to everyone saying that theirs was one of the 93,000 IDs compromised and could they now change their password. A simple copy of the site would then enable someone to lift thousands of valid credentials from accounts that weren't compromised. The problem is that Sony's users are now expecting an email to arrive to tell them to change their password. The work to trick someone to follow a link has already been done by Sony and the media.

How about not sending an email? Instead, publicise the attack and that some accounts have been disabled (Sony has done this). Next, let the users come to the Sony sites and try to log in. Then you can inform them that their account has been disabled and what the password reset procedure is.

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